Skip to main content

Reed visits Family Resources to call attention to federal cuts

March 28, 2013

Melissa Rouleau, an adult education and employment training instructor for Family Resources, gives Sen. Jack Reed an overview of the agency's programs during his tour Tuesday of the facility at 55 Main St. in Woonsocket.

WOONSOCKET – U.S. Senator Jack Reed, D-RI, paid a visit to Family Resources Community Action’s 55 Main St. Employment Center Tuesday to call attention to its work and the potential impact of federal budget cuts locally.
Reed toured the Center’s youth and adult job training classrooms and spoke with Family Resources instructor Melissa Rouleau and Youth Services manager Stump Olsen about their work with area residents in the center.
There was no need to convince Reed of the agency’s importance given his past work with Executive Director Ben Lessing and Deputy Executive Director Nancy Paradee to secure federal support for the private, non-profit social service agency.
“I’m looking not only at their needs but at the great work they are doing in terms of preparing not just young people but everybody for the work force,” Reed said during the tour.
The agency has programs helping young people take their General Equivalency Diploma (GED) tests, obtain work credentials and information about jobs, and also offering help in preparing for interviews.
“The key here is getting people the skills to become independent and able to manage their own affairs,” Reed said. The programs also help build financial literacy, he noted, and Family Resources’ assistance “is something that has to be done and be done well,” he said.
Lessing said Family Resources is expecting a potential 5 percent reduction in its federal support as a result of the federal government’s sequestration funding reductions but added there could be additional impacts as the federal rollbacks affect other agencies assisting area residents.
“If HeadStart loses capacity, and in Rhode Island, HeadStart is supposed to lose 200 slots, that just sort of cascades down in terms of families who aren’t able to use daycare, who aren’t able to attend job training programs like this, and aren’t able to work,” Lessing said.
“And so it becomes a problem down the line,” he added.
Reed said the first cut under sequestration is roughly 5 percent, “and that is tough, but it continues to accelerate over time because the budget line goes down and down and down.”

For the biggest game in all of football, you can bet on just about anything. What we have done here...
PROVIDENCE – Kris Dunn did everything short of taking the tickets and selling the popcorn...
WOONSOCKET – The two animal control officers who had been placed on administrative leave earlier this month amid...
With the Blizzard of 2015 headed out to sea, the clouds gave way to partial sun just after 9:30 Wednesday morning, a...
PROVIDENCE – With the Blizzard of 2015 shaping as one of the most damaging on record, Gov. Gina Raimondo on Monday...

 

Premium Drupal Themes by Adaptivethemes