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Families of local residents killed on September 11 prepare for opening of museum

April 5, 2014

The last time Patrick Nassaney visited the World Trade Center site in New York was the fall of 2002, the first anniversary of the Sept. 11 attacks. A year after two planes struck the twin towers, killing nearly 3,000 people, ground zero was still a disaster site and debris field when Nassaney and other 9/11 families gathered to pay tribute to the victims 12 years ago.

“We haven’t returned since for a lot of reasons,” says Nassaney, who lost his son, Shawn M. Nassaney, in the attacks. “When we were there it was a big crater. Now, it’s hallowed grounds.”

Nassaney and his wife Margaret will be among the 9/11 families who make the emotional journey back to New York next month for the opening of a long-awaited National September 11 Memorial Museum dedicated to the victims of the attacks.

The museum will open to the public on May 21, followed by a ceremony and six-day dedication period during which the museum will be open around the clock for 9/11 family members, rescue and recovery workers, and others directly affected by the 2001 attacks.

Full story can be found on page A1 of Sunday's Call.

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